Do you investigate everything you really need to when a prospective customer approaches you?

This is an unusual question for anyone to ask, after all we are all grateful when a potential new customer approaches us.  So why am I asking this question now?

Many businesses are going through a period of massive change… old style business models are being replaced by what appear to be leaner, faster moving, sometimes digitised models that involve using the services of people and companies you’ve not used before.  Companies are outsourcing more, they are sending goods and services out for external processing by specialists, before sometimes getting them back for further processing – in the past companies often tried to do everything in-house, now it is generally recognised that doing so is a massive mistake, no company whatever its size can hope to have all the skills and resources to keep all aspects of their operations at the cutting edge in an increasingly complex and fast moving world.  We are all being asked to do more work by companies we have never heard of before.  So what’s the problem?

The problem there is no past history of working with that company, and increasingly I’m seeing companies – particularly engineering companies – who are outsourcing to specialists, closing down some or all of their own departments.  And that brings massive risk to the company that accept such work… especially as I have seen several times in recent weeks those companies looking to outsource appear to be very close to insolvency and are merely supplier hopping, leaving a trail of unpaid debts behind them which, if you accept such work, would put the very existence of your business at risk.

So here are a few questions for you to ask / things for you to do before you take on a new customer / client:

  1. Why is the customer looking to use your services / outsource? Really dig down deep on this…is it for valid reasons that should stand the test of time or is it merely an effort to stave off cash flow problems, to get you to do work for which you will struggle to get paid?
  2. Why you?  Why not someone else?  What’s so special about you?  Is it merely because they see you as a easy touch because you need more work?  Or is it because you and you alone have the skills they really need?
  3. Why have they closed down their own department who used to do the work you are being asked to do?  Was it because they lost or made redundant the staff in that department (if so, why?), was it because they couldn’t properly manage the department or manage or control the work flowing through it? (in small industries or in a small area like the Black Country it may be possible to ask former staff for the real reasons, don’t be afraid to seek them out, either using your contacts or even social media).  Same for any previous supplier of such services, do you know who they are, can you speak to them?
  4. What do you know about the prospective new customer’s contract with its customer?  Does it enable such outsourcing?  (I’m seeing instances where work is being passed out where the contract specifically prohibits doing so – this is a very real warning not to get involved because the ultimate customer as and when they find out will not pay, and that means you will probably not be paid either, they will argue that the reason they are not getting paid is your fault).
  5. What do you know about the customer’s history and its finances and its directors’ / senior management’s history?  Do in-depth searches on them.  Not just cursory credit searches.  Do they habitually leave a trail of subcontractor destruction, liquidations or administrations behind them?  Are their finances strong, or not?  – And actually look behind the figures, don’t take them on face value – I’m seeing groups who have recently liquidated subsidiary or associated companies in order to jettison large levels of external debts (this could be you next time they do this!), where their failures will have a massive knock on effect on the remaining group companies which are not reflected in the  accounts or credit ratings – they have delayed filing their current accounts  to hide their true financial position.  Who are the customer’s external accountants / auditors – are they reputable or could they be working closely with their client to orchestrate the eventual failure and rebirth of the business (after writing your debt off)? – again, I’m seeing evidence of this…
  6. What’s the rumour mill saying about them?  Are there any murmurs of under-pricing, suppliers not being paid on time, fabrication of reasons not to pay, non-deliveries, resignations, sudden changes in staff/suppliers, etc?
  7. Who can you talk to whom you can trust, if anyone, to satisfy yourself as to the customer’s motives and reliability?  If they have been involved in any recent failures, pull down the statement of affairs, talk to the suppliers you know who have been left behind.  Think about others – customers, employees, advisers.  If there is no one you can talk to, then you might think about not accepting the work.
  8. Think about what’s the worst that can happen?  Then budget for it because there is a good chance it will happen… would it take down your business or be something that you can simply put down to experience?  What ‘hold’ if any do you have over the customer os its directors once you have started to do your work?  Should you be asking for a personal guarantee from the customer’s directors?

Right now I am seeing good businesses being put at massive risk by unscrupulous companies – yes, as much as it hurts me to say it, by Black Country businesses – who appear to be following the Carillion example of massive subcontractor abuse.  Make sure it’s not you who suffers as a result… and if you are an accountant or lawyer whose client has been asked to take on a big contract which might hurt them if they’re not paid, why not ask me for my thoughts? – it might just be the difference between you losing a client or your client going under themselves, or not.

The ten reasons businesses fail

  1.  The business was started and run for the wrong reasons.Some companies are set up and then run more like a hobby than a business.  Lifestyle businesses tend to merely exist, not doing spectacularly, until something bad happens to cause the wheels to come off;
  2. I can do it all myself!In his book, the E-myth, Michael Gerber spoke of the 3 skill-sets needed by business owners today – entrepreneurial, managerial and technical.  No one I know has all three, in the right degrees, not in today’s fast pacing business environment.  Seeking support from outside the business to plug skills gaps is a show of real strength, not weakness.
  3. Inadequate working capital.It always costs more than you’d expect to set up a business and survive the inevitable troughs later on.  It’s incredibly dangerous to rely on credit lines over which you don’t have full control.  Either way, the business owner didn’t properly assess how much money would be needed, where it’s best to get it from or what might happen;
  4. Weak financial skillsEvery business owner needs to understand how the business clicks financially.  If you don’t, you haven’t a business, you’ve got a hobby.  If you’ve got weak financial skills, there’s a good chance you probably also lack the profit motive, you love what you do and will return to stereotype ‘manager’ or technician’ roles when things get bad, digging an even bigger hole for yourself.  ask us to explain this;
  5. The location is wrongQuite simply, the business opportunity was not fully explored;
  6. Lack of planningThere’s a lot of truth in the saying ‘to fail to plan is to plan to fail’.   The unexpected does happen, particularly in our increasingly complicated world!;
  7. Over-trading (and what I call under trading)Over-trading / over-confidence can cause terminal cash problems in fast moving businesses.

    There is also something I call ‘under-trading’, where the business owner adopts a strategy of merely cutting costs to deal with their financial, operational and strategic problems – they do this because doing so can be the easiest decision and produces short term cash benefits.  However, we find that if this is all you do, you store up much more severe problems in the medium term.  It’s simply not possible to cut yourself to greatness!;

  8. Poor marketingThe Company waits for business to come to it, as ‘it always has done’.  The business could be ‘invisible’, there’s no route to the changing market, no sales force;
  9. Failing to follow a clear strategic directionOver time the business develops haphazardly.  It is slowly strangled by ‘unfair’ relationships with major customers, suppliers or employee groups;
  10. Inflexible business modelAn inflexible business model and high fixed cost base while they may work in boom times cause significant problems in the inevitable times of bust.

If your business demonstrates and of these, we can help… just call us on 01902 672323 now.

Co-Op Bank problems?

Have you been told by the Co-Op Bank that you should be looking to re-bank elsewhere, to find another lender because you no longer fit the bank’s criteria going forward?

If this is you, please contact us straight away so, together, we can explore your options – the short time you have been given will quickly pass.

Paul can be contacted on 07813 102014 or by email through paul@midlandsbusinessrecovery.co.uk

Another (small) screw in the coffin of smaller community credit unions

A good many small community based credit unions have had a torrid time in recent years and probably right now aren’t seeing much of an improvement.  The Co-Op Bank’s decision to cut the interest it pays on its community bank accounts – such s their Community Directplus, Co-Operatives Directplu and Social Enterprise Directplus accounts – will prove to be another, small and slow, but certain turn on the screw in the coffin of already beleagured credit unions.

Small community based credit unions are really struggling – at best, they have seen flat income levels, at worst they’ve seen their income fall away, especially from grants and interest receipts.   Yet there is often little opportunity for them to reduce their overheads in line with the fall in income.  Trying to increase income by growing the loan book can often carry a disproportionate risk of bad debts so for some they have a stark choice – grow or merge or die a death of a thousand cuts.  The Co-Op decision will prove to be just another cut…

Let’s look at what the Co-Op is doing…

Interest rates paid on customer balances have never been lower, certainly not in my lifetime.  Until June the Co-Op will be paying a tiered rate of interest – Nil% on balances up to £1,999; 0.12%  on balances £2,000 to £9,999; 0.15% on balances £10,000 to £24,999; 0.18% on balances £25,000 to £99,999; 0.21% on balances £100,000 to £249,999; and 0.25% on balances over £250,000.

That’s to say the most the Co-Op will ever pay any credit union right now is one quarter of one per cent per annum… peanuts.

Yet those peanuts are being crushed!

The new rates from June 2015 will be: balances up to £24,999 Nothing, yes absolutely nothing – the Co-Op will get to keep your money for free!; £25,000 to £99,999 0.06% – a third of the already derisory amount it had paid previously; £100,000 to £249,000 0.09% – less than half it had previously paid; £250,000 to £499,000 0.18% – a cut of one third from the rate it had paid previously; over £500,000 0.25%, no change.

The message is clear… the Co-Op isn’t interested in supporting small organisations, it’s using you, the small credit union, to extract itself from its own financial difficulties … it doesn’t have the cohonas to abuse bigger organisations in the same way as they’re prepared to abuse you.

So it’s you, the smaller community based credit unions, and organisations just like you who will feel the brunt of this decision… it will be another straw on the camel’s back…

You see, right now, because you’re getting virtually nothing on the money you are sitting on and with additional grant income difficult to come by, the only way you can meet the regulator’s solvency targets might be by increasing the interest you receive on your loan book.  As you’re limited by law as to the maximum interest rate you can charge on the loans you make, this means you need to grow your loan volumes – the number of loans you put out and the amount you loan out.

The issue is you need to do this without increasing your bad debts.  Desperate people will go to any lengths – you will be lied to, some applications will be pure fabrication. How robust are your application procedures throughout your credit union?  You might get credit reports on potential new lending, but how reliable are those reports? – they are not as accurate as you’d hope!  And you probably can’t always rely on your longstanding members’ past savings history as an indication of their ability to repay any new loans – because people have so many ways nowadays of avoiding repaying their debts – not just the formal insolvency processes of bankruptcy, DRO, and IVA, and informal debt solutions such as DMP and DRO, but also pleading poverty in any debt collection process passing through the courts, and even disappearing.

It’s easy to see the situation whereby a credit union that’s already struggling with the the regulator could be forced into administration and then closure because of its bad debt experience and low level of bank interest income.

 

Another (small) screw in the coffin of smaller community credit unions

A good many small community based credit unions have had a torrid time in recent years and probably right now aren’t seeing much of an improvement.  The Co-Op Bank’s decision to cut the interest it pays on its community bank accounts – such s their Community Directplus, Co-Operatives Directplu and Social Enterprise Directplus accounts – will prove to be another, small and slow, but certain turn on the screw in the coffin of already beleagured credit unions.

Small community based credit unions are really struggling – at best, they have seen flat income levels, at worst they’ve seen their income fall away, especially from grants and interest receipts.   Yet there is often little opportunity for them to reduce their overheads in line with the fall in income.  Trying to increase income by growing the loan book can often carry a disproportionate risk of bad debts so for some they have a stark choice – grow or merge or die a death of a thousand cuts.  The Co-Op decision will prove to be just another cut…

Let’s look at what the Co-Op is doing…

Interest rates paid on customer balances have never been lower, certainly not in my lifetime.  Until June the Co-Op will be paying a tiered rate of interest – Nil% on balances up to £1,999; 0.12%  on balances £2,000 to £9,999; 0.15% on balances £10,000 to £24,999; 0.18% on balances £25,000 to £99,999; 0.21% on balances £100,000 to £249,999; and 0.25% on balances over £250,000.

That’s to say the most the Co-Op will ever pay any credit union right now is one quarter of one per cent per annum… peanuts.

Yet those peanuts are being crushed!

The new rates from June 2015 will be: balances up to £24,999 Nothing, yes absolutely nothing – the Co-Op will get to keep your money for free!; £25,000 to £99,999 0.06% – a third of the already derisory amount it had paid previously; £100,000 to £249,000 0.09% – less than half it had previously paid; £250,000 to £499,000 0.18% – a cut of one third from the rate it had paid previously; over £500,000 0.25%, no change.

The message is clear… the Co-Op isn’t interested in supporting small organisations, it’s using you, the small credit union, to extract itself from its own financial difficulties … it doesn’t have the cohonas to abuse bigger organisations in the same way as they’re prepared to abuse you.

So it’s you, the smaller community based credit unions, and organisations just like you who will feel the brunt of this decision… it will be another straw on the camel’s back…

You see, right now, because you’re getting virtually nothing on the money you are sitting on and with additional grant income difficult to come by, the only way you can meet the regulator’s solvency targets might be by increasing the interest you receive on your loan book.  As you’re limited by law as to the maximum interest rate you can charge on the loans you make, this means you need to grow your loan volumes – the number of loans you put out and the amount you loan out.

The issue is you need to do this without increasing your bad debts.  Desperate people will go to any lengths – you will be lied to, some applications will be pure fabrication. How robust are your application procedures throughout your credit union?  You might get credit reports on potential new lending, but how reliable are those reports? – they are not as accurate as you’d hope!  And you probably can’t always rely on your longstanding members’ past savings history as an indication of their ability to repay any new loans – because people have so many ways nowadays of avoiding repaying their debts – not just the formal insolvency processes of bankruptcy, DRO, and IVA, and informal debt solutions such as DMP and DRO, but also pleading poverty in any debt collection process passing through the courts, and even disappearing.

It’s easy to see the situation whereby a credit union that’s already struggling with the the regulator could be forced into administration and then closure because of its bad debt experience and low level of bank interest income.